Jesus said to them: “Watch out that no one deceives you. Many will come in my name, claiming, ‘I am he,’ and will deceive many.”  (Mark 13:5 NIV)

As Papa ten Boom, Corrie’s father, said in The Hiding Place, “Just because a mouse is in the cookie jar, it does not make him a cookie.”

The “mouse in the cookie jar” was a reference to the their pastor. In his clergy garb, he had just counseled Papa and his two daughters, Corrie and Betsy, to cease their efforts on behalf of the Jews. The Ten Booms were defying their Nazi occupiers at great risk to themselves, by helping Jews escape Holland and almost certain death.

The Ten Boom’s shepherd spoke as though he was caring for his flock. He sat stoically, and appealed to their objectivity. But Papa Casper ten Boom told his minister, “The Jew is the apple of God’s eye. How can we, as a family, do nothing?”

Let history judge who was right. The names of the Ten Booms appears on the wall of “The Righteous Among the Nations”, an honor accorded non-Jews by the State of Israel presented to those who risked their lives during the Holocaust to save Jews from extermination. Where might the ten Boom’s pastor have his name written? He might as well be nameless.

Beware of those who wear sheep’s clothing while making a pretense of objectivity. They are not sheep, but wolves. That is what Jesus warns about (above) in “The Olivet Discourse” (Matthew 24, Mark 13 and Luke 21). It is up to us not to be taken in or deceived by the claim they speak in Jesus’ name. They have an angle or a hidden agenda. Don’t fall for their false or pseudo-objectivity or bad things will happen.

The world is waking up to the state of modern journalism. Years ago the news media quit reporting the story. Instead, they began to skillfully fashion their reporting in order to form public opinion. Important facts that fail to support their version are omitted while others that do are embellished. What comes to us in the news props up their specific world view or stirs the controversy they seek. Forget objectivity. It is all a pretense, a sham. Except on rare occasions, journalism is pseudo-objectivity.

I was recently informed of a scathing “one-star” critique on Amazon of my 2013 analysis of Pre-tribulation Rapturism (PTR), “Lifesaver: Rescuing God’s People from the PTR Ship” (Booklocker). My first thought on learning I was pilloried in a review was a feeling of gratitude: “Thank you, nameless one, for taking time to launch your poisoned-tipped darts.”

No doubt the reviewer would name Jesus as his Lord and Savior, as do I. As I read what “my Christian brother/sister” wrote, I could visualize their guns blazing. The review, “a fizzer”, left me wondering “Why the deceit?” There was a pretense of a serious analysis, but serious it was not–nor did it analyze anything I wrote. There was a hidden intent; keep potential readers away.

By referring to what I wrote as “a rant”, the critic’s agenda was to torpedo a reasoned, Biblical analysis of PTR,  a widely-held Christian view of prophecy. In Lifesaver, I fired my torpedoes at ideas and thoughts in order to save people, not fire at people in order to save my ideas. I should not be surprised a loyal PTR soldier, disguised as an objective critic, went for my throat.

So, I ask, is pseudo-objectivity the best that journalism or that PTR can offer? I believe there are many who see through the deception. We better see through it or Jesus’ warning will be for naught. Such things are signs the deceived, like the Ten Boom’s pastor, are on the losing side of history.

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