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Q- You seem to speak in epic terms about salvation and truth. Do you view The Priests of God as being on the scale of an epic or even a monumental volume?

A- With regard to the ideas and insights it contains, the answer is “Yes, I see it in big terms,” but not as a best seller or a hit among Christians or anything like that. An analogy is a treasure in an earthen jar. The jar is my part with all its flaws to the literary purists. The treasure is God’s part. The writing is mine and I’m about as plain, brown paper wrapping as anyone God could find. By that I mean, I have nothing to attract readers but my ideas. Everything God does is epic and His ways are monumental. I just describe what I see the Lord is doing and why. I consider myself more of a scribe than a writer. I do not like “author” as a description. Author, has a connotation that belongs to the Creator. I’m simply passing on revelations from studying prophecy, all of which I find astounding. I’m in awe of God and I hope that comes through.

Q- There are some rather amazing claims in The Priests of God. I don’t want to spoil anything, but did it occur to you that some of your more sensational discoveries could be wrong? What if you are mistaken?

A- I thought long and hard on this question. The decision I made when I finally sat down to write is that this is the hill on which I take my stand. God entrusted me with some wonderful and amazing revelations. (I am not saying that I am the only one who ever saw these things in Scripture, but I don’t know of others. I did not receive this from another person.) But, God prompted me to put what he was showing me in writing. I’ll be judged for it by men, but God is my judge. I’m willing to take the heat or the outright rejection of my fellow saints. Everything about The Priests of God is challenging and calculated to make God’s people think and dig into the Word. Some will react negatively and I get that. Some will ask others to think for them and be discouraged by their response, but God is in control of who does what. As for me, I’m willing to die for the truths I affirm in this book—obviously, I would not say all that if I had any doubts of being wrong.

My test of whether my conclusion is right or wrong is this: Can I open up my Bible and find confirmation everywhere? If anyone can show me from Scripture a passage that clearly contradicts what I have written, then, if I cannot harmonize it, I will delete it and do a mea culpa. If I am accurately interpreting the Bible, people may disagree, and often do, but their disagreement is not with me. I’m not claiming perfection, but I am a bent on accuracy. My reading of the Word is constant. I am finding more supportive passages all the time. I eliminated 150 pages of text–more or less–and four chapters from my first draft to pare it down to the size I want. What’s that tell you? I did not struggle to find material; I had to pare it down. The Priests of God: Unveiling the Order of Melchizedek is the real never-ending story.

The key that unlocks the mystery of Melchizedek came several years ago. I can’t exactly remember how or when, but I wrote into the book that God asked me a question. It became the kernel of a suggestion He planted in my brain, and, as it grew, I began to share it with a couple of my prize Bible prophecy students. (One was Benaiah, who was kind enough to provide the Foreword to The Priests of God, the other Elijah, who wrote the Foreword to Lifesaver.) The feedback from Benaiah caught me off-guard. What I heard was his concern. If I wrote this—I sensed him saying—I would do damage to how I am perceived. Later on, I shared with my sister Marilyn. I felt she was basically of the same mind as Benaiah, trying to safeguard my credibility. Some of that concern was caused by my inability to defend what sounded like a wild idea.

This is years ago now, but I could not let this idea go. One of the last people I shared it with was more adamant than the others. He was sure I was wrong. This was the big test. Some of his objections made sense, so I backed off and put The Priests of God on the shelf. Gradually, I picked it up again. Something was telling me I was accurate. I dug into all the objections and analyzed them. The Lord gave me sound counter-arguments to harmonize the objections, plus more evidence. He also gifted me with a strong biblically-minded brother, Elijah, who thought I was on to something. Finally, I had enough. I knew we were on solid ground. God was saying it is time. I left my position to give full attention to this baby the Lord conceived in me. My final confirmation was when Elijah said that I had persuaded him. No one but God could have done that.

The artist Vincent Van Gogh sold one painting during his lifetime—or so I heard. Since I gave the Lord control over marketing, I am content if I have to give away copies of The Priests of God. If, during my lifetime, no one gives this book a favorable review, I will be fine. I wrote it for my God and the glory of His Son. He will use it according to his purpose. In the meantime, I’m turning my attention to The Kings of God.

In those days there was no king in Israel, everyone did what was right in his own eyes. (Judges 21:25 NKJV)

Having worked a few years as a real estate agent taught me a lot. For sellers of property, setting a price based on the fair market value, rather than what we hope our home is worth, is key to finding a buyer in timely fashion. For home buyers, it is vital to match what we can afford with what we want. The real in real estate is matching a seller’s reasonable expectation with a buyer’s financial ability.

So it is with the struggle often faced with prophecy. The current list of popular doctrines makes it a seller’s market, which means there are plenty of buyers considering a move from one position to another. Are the buyer’s unsatisfied with the status quo? Or has something forced a change? What is it they want? It is all subjective.

Objectivity is required as well. Being objective means I want facts. Subjectivity alone makes things murky. Facts clarify our options. Regarding prophecy, how do we arrive at facts? We must consult Scripture the way a real estate appraiser examines recently sold properties. If what we desire–that is our dreams or goals–conflicts with objective truth, then we have a choice. If we choose what we subjectively want to occur in the last days as opposed to what God objectively says, we won’t like what happens.

The Bereans were accustomed to teachers who were dreamers. How would they know if the Apostle Paul was like the rest? They listened intently to what Paul said; perhaps making notes. When he finished, the Bereans went back to their (Old Testament) Scripture to see if what Paul taught lined up with truth.

The Thessalonians, however, were more subjective. Salesmen could persuade them about what was right. Consider the context of 2 Thessalonians 2:1-2. Confusion caused panic in the Thessalonian church. It came about because their subjectivity made them vulnerable to false prophecies, reports or letters about the Day of the Lord. They had listened to Paul but forgot the Biblical evidence. Many thought he was right; that is until the next gifted public speaker came along.

God has put eternity on our hearts (Ecclesiastes 3:11). Eternity is our dream. The way we achieve the unimaginable is contained in the word of God. Applying the five major rules for Bible interpretation is how we arrive at the facts. Demand accuracy in prophecy, rather than argue about who is right. Information is true or it isn’t. God is objective, not subjective. God is Mathematics and true science. God does not tolerate “adding to” what he has spoken (Proverbs 30:5-6).

In the time of the judges, subjectivity led to confusion in Israel. Everyone did what seemed right because Israel had no sovereign to set the standard. Had God been their king, they would have all agreed.

That’s where many are at today; subjectively shopping for what’s “right”. In other words, most are searching for their wants and trying to fulfill their dream. Instead, wouldn’t it be better to study our Bible with other Bereans? What if we developed a consensus for an accurate (a.k.a. Biblical) interpretation of prophecy (1 Corinthians 14:1-4)?  Isn’t it better to prize accuracy rather than the human standard of what seems right?

Lifesaver Book

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Prophets of God

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The People of God

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