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In those days there was no king in Israel, everyone did what was right in his own eyes. (Judges 21:25 NKJV)

Having worked a few years as a real estate agent taught me a lot. For sellers of property, setting a price based on the fair market value, rather than what we hope our home is worth, is key to finding a buyer in timely fashion. For home buyers, it is vital to match what we can afford with what we want. The real in real estate is matching a seller’s reasonable expectation with a buyer’s financial ability.

So it is with the struggle often faced with prophecy. The current list of popular doctrines makes it a seller’s market, which means there are plenty of buyers considering a move from one position to another. Are the buyer’s unsatisfied with the status quo? Or has something forced a change? What is it they want? It is all subjective.

Objectivity is required as well. Being objective means I want facts. Subjectivity alone makes things murky. Facts clarify our options. Regarding prophecy, how do we arrive at facts? We must consult Scripture the way a real estate appraiser examines recently sold properties. If what we desire–that is our dreams or goals–conflicts with objective truth, then we have a choice. If we choose what we subjectively want to occur in the last days as opposed to what God objectively says, we won’t like what happens.

The Bereans were accustomed to teachers who were dreamers. How would they know if the Apostle Paul was like the rest? They listened intently to what Paul said; perhaps making notes. When he finished, the Bereans went back to their (Old Testament) Scripture to see if what Paul taught lined up with truth.

The Thessalonians, however, were more subjective. Salesmen could persuade them about what was right. Consider the context of 2 Thessalonians 2:1-2. Confusion caused panic in the Thessalonian church. It came about because their subjectivity made them vulnerable to false prophecies, reports or letters about the Day of the Lord. They had listened to Paul but forgot the Biblical evidence. Many thought he was right; that is until the next gifted public speaker came along.

God has put eternity on our hearts (Ecclesiastes 3:11). Eternity is our dream. The way we achieve the unimaginable is contained in the word of God. Applying the five major rules for Bible interpretation is how we arrive at the facts. Demand accuracy in prophecy, rather than argue about who is right. Information is true or it isn’t. God is objective, not subjective. God is Mathematics and true science. God does not tolerate “adding to” what he has spoken (Proverbs 30:5-6).

In the time of the judges, subjectivity led to confusion in Israel. Everyone did what seemed right because Israel had no sovereign to set the standard. Had God been their king, they would have all agreed.

That’s where many are at today; subjectively shopping for what’s “right”. In other words, most are searching for their wants and trying to fulfill their dream. Instead, wouldn’t it be better to study our Bible with other Bereans? What if we developed a consensus for an accurate (a.k.a. Biblical) interpretation of prophecy (1 Corinthians 14:1-4)?  Isn’t it better to prize accuracy rather than the human standard of what seems right?

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